Here's the problem with the internet: It's inherently insecure. When the internet was first designed, the priority was to be able to send packets (chunks of data) as reliably as possible. Networking across the country and the world was relatively new, and nodes often went down. Most of the internet's core protocols (methods of communicating) were designed to route around failure, rather than secure data.

Server switching is a feature -- offered by most VPN service providers -- that allows you to change what region or country you're going to connect to. Most providers allow you to switch as often as you'd like (although you usually have to disconnect, then change your configuration, and reconnect). This may be useful if you're trying to hide your location, or if you're running into some communications glitches on the server you're currently using.


Nope, it’s me. I spelled my nickname wrong. My apologies. 😊 Blur has been compromised. They bravely admitted it themselves. There were also many complaints concerning billings, customer support and despite the fact I’m cautious with comments I decided not to use their services. Paypal has been accused that sells data to third parties. I’ll do a further search concerning this issue but I’ll probably go with the Paypal choice since I mostly use online banking anyway. Living in the countryside leaves me no choice than that of online banking in order to purchase the things I need so it’s a one way, and I know that eshops and banks DO sell your data too unfortunately. I will definitely read all of the links you gave me right away. Thank you very much, you are a treasure. I have benefited greatly from people like you into improving my knowledge and help others too. 👍
A VPN client on a remote user's computer or mobile device connects to a VPN gateway on the organization's network. The gateway typically requires the device to authenticate its identity. Then, it creates a network link back to the device that allows it to reach internal network resources -- e.g., file servers, printers and intranets -- as though the gateway is on the network locally.
AVG Secure VPN works for PCs with Windows, Macs, iPhones, and Android devices. It uses a port-blocking evasion algorithm and bank-grade encryption to give you private internet access, even if you’re using an unsecured network. With AVG’s VPN service, you can easily switch your IP address with a click and show your location as being anywhere from Miami to Warsaw to Hong Kong.
We have often said that having to choose between security and convenience is a false dichotomy, but it is at least somewhat true in the case of VPN services. When a VPN is active, your web traffic is taking a more circuitous route than usual, often resulting in sluggish download and upload speeds as well as increased latency. The good news is that using a VPN probably isn't going to remind you of the dial-up days of yore.
To understand the value of a VPN, it helps to think of some specific scenarios in which a VPN might be used. Consider the public Wi-Fi network, perhaps at a coffee shop or airport. Normally, you might connect without a second thought. But do you know who might be watching the traffic on that network? Can you even be sure the Wi-Fi network is legit, or might it operated by a thief who's after your personal data? Think about the passwords, banking data, credit card numbers, and just plain private information that you transmit every time you go online.
And they manage to do all of this without sacrificing performance, offering one of the fastest download speeds (83 Mbps out of 100 Mbps) and the best 24/7 customer support in the industry. The only downside? It’s a little on the pricey side, with monthly plans starting between $6.67 and $12.95/mo. But it’s a small price to pay for excellent performance in almost every category.
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