These last week’s I have thoroughly read everything concerning privacy and security and during the next days I will definitely take the necessary steps to become more security and privacy conscious. I was definitely wrong for not doing this more all these years but I’m just an everyday person, nothing to hide really so I was unaware of the extensive stalking from well…everyone above. That really pisses me off. Still, I’m an everyday person with everyday needs. Nothing shady or risky. How can someone ensure privacy when most people use a prepaid card buying online? I don’t live in a big city and buying online is essential for necessities. I still have to give a name, a phone number, a billing address and a card number to do my job. The delivery service still needs to come to my house. Even if I rented a PO BOX, I still need to provide an ID, and every data requested. So isn’t that a necessary evil that somehow sabotages the whole idea? Any suggestions? Also, I strongly believe that if someone isn’t really deep in knowing what to do, REALLY do, in order to go stealth, everything else is still a bet. For example, I believe that if an everyday user (like me or most of us for example) that uses the net to buy stuff, watch Netflix or read the news (I don’t have facebook, Twitter or anything that makes me visible) suddenly ” disappears ” by using a vpn, a private browser, change OS etc. wouldn’t that draws attention to the ISP and every other data collecting agency? I think that privacy and data collection is more challenging than we think. PS: Sven, you are a treasure. 👍
OpenVPN: OpenVPN is very secure, open-source and widely used. Most VPN services support it, but except for Chrome OS and Linux, few operating systems do. This protocol can be used in either TCP (web) or UDP (streaming) mode; the latter is sloppier but faster. You'll need either the VPN service's client software or one of the many free alternatives. Either way, you'll still need to pay for the VPN service.
VPNArea is one of the few providers that offer dedicated IP addresses in various countries around the world, as listed on their website. They also allow account sharing and permit six simultaneous connections per subscription. VPNArea continues to improve and remains an excellent choice for privacy-focused users. Check out their discount pricing for annual plans. [Learn more >]

When you connect your computer (or another device, such as a smartphone or tablet) to a VPN, the computer acts as if it’s on the same local network as the VPN. All your network traffic is sent over a secure connection to the VPN. Because your computer behaves as if it’s on the network, this allows you to securely access local network resources even when you’re on the other side of the world. You’ll also be able to use the Internet as if you were present at the VPN’s location, which has some benefits if you’re using pubic Wi-Fi or want to access geo-blocked websites.
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After a year of new reviews, it’s time to update our best VPN guide. If this is your first time, welcome. Over the course of it, we’re going to show the best VPN providers for every use case, accounting for streaming, torrenting, general privacy and more. If you don’t care to read the 6,000 or so words that make it up, though, you can go easy mode and just sign up for an account with ExpressVPN.
CyberGhost gives Mullvad some stiff competition in the speed department, especially for locations in North America and Europe. It does a good job protecting user anonymity, too—requiring no identifying information and using a third-party service for payment processing—albeit not to the same degree as Mullvad. Add to that CyberGhost’s unique, easy-to-use interface, good price, and streaming unblocking (although not for Netflix), and this VPN is a solid choice. (See our full review of CyberGhost.)

VPN services are entirely legal and legitimate in most countries. It's completely legal to mask your IP address and encrypt your internet traffic. There is nothing about using a VPN that's illegal and VPN services themselves do not and cannot do anything illegal. The only thing that's illegal is if you were to break the law while using a VPN - for instance if you were to infringe on someone's copyright. But that's the action of infringement that's illegal, not the use of the VPN.
Since we first recommended IVPN in the spring of 2018, the company has added automatic server selection to its desktop applications, bringing it in line with other top-performing VPN apps. Alternatively, when you click on the location at the bottom of the app, you’ll see a list of all of the global IVPN server locations, color coded by speed. At the top of the list is an option to connect to the fastest one, and once selected, the app remembers your preference through future disconnects and reboots. You can also use IVPN’s multihop servers to route your traffic through two VPN servers—a feature unique to IVPN among the services we tested—though we don’t think this step is necessary for most people, given the slower speeds you’ll likely experience.
We're not cryptography experts, so we can't verify all of the encryption claims providers make. Instead, we focus on the features provided. Bonus features like ad blocking, firewalls, and kill switches that disconnect you from the web if your VPN connection drops, go a long way toward keeping you safe. We also prefer providers that support OpenVPN, since it's a standard that's known for its speed and reliability. It's also, as the name implies, open source, meaning it benefits from many developers' eyes looking for potential problems.
There are other considerations, too. Novice users can easily connect to a VPN, but setting up a VPN server is a more complex process. SSH tunnels are more daunting to novice users, but setting up an SSH server is simpler – in fact, many people will already have an SSH server that they access remotely. If you already have access to an SSH server, it’s much easier to use it as an SSH tunnel than it is to set up a VPN server. For this reason, SSH tunnels have been dubbed a “poor man’s VPN.”
The VPN client communicates over the public Internet and sends the computer’s network traffic through the encrypted connection to the VPN server. The encryption provides a secure connection, which means the business’s competitors can’t snoop on the connection and see sensitive business information. Depending on the VPN, all the computer’s network traffic may be sent over the VPN – or only some of it may (generally, however, all network traffic goes through the VPN). If all web browsing traffic is sent over the VPN, people between the VPN client and server can’t snoop on the web browsing traffic. This provides protection when using public Wi-Fi networks and allows users to access geographically-restricted services – for example, the employee could bypass Internet censorship if they’re working from a country that censors the web. To the websites the employee accesses through the VPN, the web browsing traffic would appear to be coming from the VPN server.
IVPN goes further than the other leading candidates we considered by being transparent about who runs the service and is responsible for your privacy. The company lists its core team on its website, and its small team has an online presence on a variety of platforms. In contrast, only one employee at ExpressVPN has a public face: VP of marketing Harold Li gave us detailed answers to questions about policies and internal security, but couldn’t tell us much about who else worked there. (We discuss ExpressVPN in more detail in the Competition section—that company was almost our top pick but for this issue.)

Finding the best free VPN is an exercise in balancing those restrictions. TunnelBear, for example, lets you use any server on its network but limits you to 500MB-1GB per month. Avira Phantom VPN lets you use as many devices as you like and any server you like, but also restricts you to 500MB per month. AnchorFree Hotspot Shield also places no limits on the number of devices, but restricts you to 500MB per day and only US-based servers. Kaspersky Secure Connection also doesn't limit your devices but doesn't let you choose a VPN server—the app does it automatically.


If you are listening to music with one of these streaming apps, you are most likely using a mobile device. When choosing a top VPN like Ipvanish or VPN express, you will want to be sure that your premium VPN service also offers coverage for mobile and if you are a Windows user, make sure you go for a VPN for windows. A mobile VPN will cover you on the go, so you never have to worry about your online privacy, whether you’re on your desktop computer, smartphone, or tablet.
One of the most important factors when you’re choosing a VPN provider is also the hardest to quantify: trust. All your Internet activity will flow through this company’s servers, so you have to trust that company more than the network you’re trying to secure, be it a local coffee shop’s Wi-Fi, your campus Internet connection, your corporate IT network, or your home ISP. In all our research, we came across a lot of gray areas when it came to trusting a VPN, and only two hard rules: Know who you’re trusting, and remember that security isn’t free.
This could be bad. I'm not terribly concerned if Comcast discovers my secret passion for muscle cars and I get more ads for car customizing kits. It might be annoying, but I'm not doing anything I really want to hide. Where the problem could occur is if ISPs start inserting their own ads in place of ads by, say, ZDNet. That could cut off the revenue that keeps websites alive, and that could have very serious repercussions.

Given the aggressive pricing and marketing of other services that don’t measure up to our picks, IVPN’s most obvious downside may look like its price: At the time of this writing, the regular price for an annual IVPN subscription is $100 (about $8 per month). Promotions regularly bringing that down to $70 to $80 per year, but some services have regular pricing of half that. But you shouldn’t pay for a VPN you can’t trust, or one so slow or confusing that you avoid using it at all. We think IVPN’s combination of trust, security, and performance is worth the price. But if it’s too expensive for your needs, consider our budget pick instead.

Technology is increasingly interwoven into cities, regions, and our lives, leading us to a faster, more connected, and more intelligent world. With real-time access to this level of intelligence and analytics, cities will transform to better meet the needs of all who work, live, and play there. Cities will not only sense and respond to current events (becoming living organisms that … Continue Reading...


A “kill switch” goes by many names, but the term describes VPN software that shuts off all network traffic in and out of your computer if the encrypted connection fails. A hiccup in your Wi-Fi or even with your ISP can cause a VPN to disconnect, and if you then maintain an unsecure connection—especially if the VPN software doesn’t alert you that it’s no longer protecting your traffic—that wipes out all the benefits of your VPN. We considered kill switches to be mandatory. And although we looked for apps that made it easy to add rules about when to activate kill switches, we considered special config files or manual firewall tweaks to be too complex. (iOS doesn’t support any kill-switch features; we address a few iOS-specific problems that apply to all VPN services in a separate section.)
It does not matter if a VPN offers strict no logging policies. If it exists outside every major surveillance alliance, or offers lightening speeds. The minute it leaks your IP, everything goes to the garbage, as your private identity comes forward. Buffered VPN, despite being new, follows through on all its promises. The DNS leak test did not reveal our true location.
Since we last tested VPNs, we've given special attention to the privacy practices of VPN companies and not just the technology they provide. In our testing, we read through the privacy policies and discuss company practices with VPN service representatives. What we look for is a commitment to protect user information, and to take a hands-off approach to gathering user data.
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We checked Google Searches and other metrics to learn that ZenMate exists as one of the most popular choices for most VPN users. As such, we obviously had to review the provider, which took us around 24-hours. We tested its performance for facets relating to privacy, P2P/Torrenting and streaming/unblocking. Overall, we would say that the Berlin-based provider is definitely upping its game, preparing to compete with other hit services.


However, things do not just end here, as the VPN even offers plenty of advanced features. These include NAT Firewall for preventing malicious attempts on your network. Split Tunneling and SOCKS5 proxy for improved performance to download torrents and stream content online. Ad/Tracker blocking features to hide away those irritating adverts when browsing the internet.
Keep in mind, that no VPN service provides complete security and privacy, but just adds one layer of protection in that direction. In addition, a VPN is held by a company. The company may change its policies or provide data to governments if National Security might be at stake. Using a VPN does not deem you free of any rules and regulations – you have to abide by the laws of the country you reside in, the country hosting the VPN service and probably some others. You are not completely anonymous by simply setting and using a VPN.
For large-scale implementations, choose a hardware device such as a VPN concentrator or VPN-enabled network appliance. Hardware-based VPNs perform better for larger installations. Also, the security of a software-based VPN built on a host with an OS such as Windows, UNIX, or Linux depends on the underlying security of that OS. Thus, you must keep the OS patched as well as keep an eye on the VPN software.
CyberGhost has been around since 2011 and has come out strongly as a supporter of "civil rights, a free society, and an uncensored Internet culture." We really liked how the company specifically showcases, on their Web site, how folks normally prevented from accessing such important services as Facebook and YouTube can bring those services into their lives via a VPN.
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